Re: GRAMMER

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This is a football message board.

I don't think it really matters if people don't know how to pronounce schedule, the 'c' is silent. I don't think it really matters that most people use the word disinterested, when they mean uninterested. Enormity doesn't mean big it means evil. I could go on. And lest anyone thinks I am immune to such failings, until last year I was misusing the word hiatus.

First world problems chaps. :grin:

Re: GRAMMER

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Stan A. Einstein wrote: January 3rd, 2024, 11:54 pm This is a football message board.

I don't think it really matters if people don't know how to pronounce schedule, the 'c' is silent. I don't think it really matters that most people use the word disinterested, when they mean uninterested. Enormity doesn't mean big it means evil. I could go on. And lest anyone thinks I am immune to such failings, until last year I was misusing the word hiatus.

First world problems chaps. :grin:
The title of this thread is either pure genius, or pure comedy.

Re: GRAMMER

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[/quote]

The title of this thread is either pure genius, or pure comedy.
[/quote]

Yes, agreed. Reminds me of a job interview I attended where the interviewer asked me ‘How’s your grammar?”, to which I replied “She’s well, thanks, a little unsteady on her feet but generally healthy “.

I also think Norm was being mischievous in his lack of punctuation, but I pedantically agree with his frustration. Standards of English have fallen in both speech and written notes in recent years. It’s up to us elder statesman to educate the plebs I guess.

Re: GRAMMER

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Well, technically speaking, mad norm (and those who agree with him) is both correct and (sort of) incorrect.

Major dictionaries like the OED and Merriam-Webster list "of" as an auxiliary verb (to be used in conjunction with other modal/auxiliary verbs in replacing "have" or contractions thereof). Granted, they indicate it is non-standard and the example used in Merriam-Webster makes particular note of it being used "in place of the contraction 've often in representations of uneducated speech".

So there you have it. Yes, it is wrong (to the educated). But the uneducated can legitimately point to major dictionaries and say, "Look, 'of' is listed as a verb. So, phooey to you!" [More likely, "Phuck you!" in truth.]

Of course, the uneducated rarely look at dictionaries, so the riposte is unlikely (though they may still entertain the "Phu..." epithet usage I suppose).

Of course, the uneducated who look at this dictionary entry and continue to use the non-standard "of" auxiliary verb remain uneducated, IMVHO...

Re: GRAMMER

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Good Evening

Whilst broadly agreeing with Norm, it’s a case of accepting the changes in life as we get older and more detached from common and popular useage of the masses. Phone use, with auto spelling etc makes the user “language lazy”.
People don’t write things down using pen and paper anymore. Often spelling errors are just fut fanger issues! And predictive text is just a nightmare as majority of folk just hit submit without a quick proof read first.
As long as the meaning of the sayer is understood by the recipient then that’s what’s important.

Language changes…
Newport are crap was in common useage when I was a lad, but nowadays Newport are quite good is taking over!

Phil in Northampton

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